Elective Courses

Elective Courses for Spring 2018:

ANTH 898.084: ENGAGING ETHNOGRAPHY, DR. ANGELA STUESSE, DEPT. OF ANTHROPOLOGY

  • What is engaged ethnography? We often speak of engaged research, but what does it look like on the ground? How is it represented through textual narrative? And what difference does it make in the “real” world? In this course we will “engage” these questions through an exploration of ethnographies produced by politically- and community engaged researchers. We will read approximately one book-length ethnography per week, and all authors will be invited to join us for an informal conversation about their work. With an eye to how methodologies, theoretical approaches, and the products of research are transformed by various forms of engagement, students will seek to define their own approach to engaged scholarship.

ANTH 674.001: ISSUES in CULTURAL HERITAGE, ERIC DEETZ, DEPT. of ANTHROPOLOGY

  • This course examines entanglements between the past and present from multiple and conflicting perspectives, highlighting an archaeological point of view. Models of participatory research are considered in relation to cultural heritage, and indigenous-rights perspectives are discussed in reference to archaeological, nation-state, and global interests.

GLBL 382: LATIN AMERICAN MIGRANT PERSPECTIVES: Ethnography and Action, DR. HANNAH GILL, DEPT. of GLOBAL STUDIES

  • This 3 credit Spring course is interdisciplinary, combining qualitative methods, migration theory, and service-learning in a course that examines Latin American immigrant perspectives. Students will research and work with immigrants in receiving communities in North Carolina and spend spring break in immigrants’ home communities in Guanajuato, Mexico.

HBEH 710: COMMUNITY CAPACITY, COMPETENCE, and POWER, DR. GENI ENG and DR. ALEX LIGHTFOOT, DEPT. of HEALTH BEHAVIOR

  • The nature and delineation of participatory action research and its relevance to concepts, principles, and practices of community empowerment.  Students learn methods, such as photovoice, through learning projects. This seminar will have three core areas of focus and integration. First, participants will be engaged in interactive learning about community-based participatory action research (CBPR), an approach to inquiry that centers on community strengths and issues, and provides people with the means to conduct systematic investigation for the purposes of education and taking systematic action to resolve specific problems. Second, we will use the principles and theoretical grounding of CBPR to discuss concepts central to this process, including community competence, citizen participation and community development. Third, participants will conduct a fieldwork project using photography with a community that will generate critical thinking about the methodological contexts of public health research and their shifting “locations of power” during the various stages of the CBPR process.

Elective Courses for Fall 2017:

ARTS/COMM 637: SOCIAL PRACTICE & PERFORMANCE ART, PROFESSOR TONY PERUCCI, DEPT. OF COMMUNICATION and PROFESSOR HONG-AN TRUONG, STUDIO ART

  • In this course, students will explore Socially Engaged Art practices that challenge the distinction between art and life; are fundamentally collaborative; value process over end product; and utilize action, dialogue, and participation as strategies as an intervention in public discourse. This course locates Socially Engaged Art as a central practice in the histories of both visual art and performance art. Through analysis of arts practice as a critical aspect of social movements, this course uses the aesthetic language of both contexts to examine the role of arts in society and its relationship to civic life.

COMM 798 (SECTION 001): ADVANCED QUALITATIVE METHODS, DR. TORIN MONAHAN, DEPT. OF COMMUNICATION

  • The world is hard to crack. Fortunately, there are tools and techniques to help one make sense of complex social, cultural, and political-economic processes. This explicitly interdisciplinary seminar is designed to give students in-depth exposure to ethnographic and related research methods, including participant observation, interviews, action research, photography, and more. Students will also learn to analyze and evaluate qualitative data (e.g., field notes, interview transcripts, websites, and documents). To contextualize the focus on methods, we will read some key ethnographic works and trace the development of related theory over the past few decades. The emphasis will be on global and transnational issues, which have resonance in localities in all countries, including the U.S.

COMM 841 (FOLK 841): PERFORMANCE ETHNOGRAPHY, DR. RENEE ALEXANDER-CRAFT

 

  • This seminar focuses on methods of ethnography and fieldwork ethics. Performance as theory and practice informs methodological inquiries as well as the analysis of specific ethnographic texts and case studies.

EDUC 861.001: Special Education Seminar: Translational Research and Implementation Science, Dr. Harriet Able and Dr. Nancy Bagatell

 

  • Translational research and implementation science are currently a “hot topics” in education, allied health, and the social sciences. This seminar will focus on current issues, needs, and challenges confronting our fields as we translate research to practice. The translation of knowledge bi-directionally between research and practice will be the main focus. We will explore how practice can inform research and how research can be translated to practice. Students will develop interdisciplinary community engaged research projects with community stakeholders which could serve as pilot studies for dissertation research. Strategies for collaborating with interdisciplinary and community partners in the generation, implementation, and dissemination of research focused on children, youth, and families from diverse and high need communities will be emphasized.
    Suggested Prerequisites: Research Method related courses in quantitative and qualitative methodologies are recommended

PLAN 764: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND REVITALIZATION TECHNIQUES, DR. MAI THI NGUYEN, CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING

 

  • The steps involved in developing neighborhood revitalization plans. Students work with local neighborhood associations in identifying both community assets and problems and the various stakeholders, conducting research on selected issues, developing and selecting strategies for addressing those issues, and formulating an implementation strategy.

RELI 524: ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACHES TO CONTEMPORARY RELIGION, DR. LAUREN LEVE, DEPT. OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES

 

  • A critical exploration of contemporary ethnographic research on religion, and on the epistemological assumptions that undergird different types of ethnographic knowledge. We will read and discuss an award-winning or otherwise exemplary book each week, focusing on the ways that ethnographic methods and writing choices shape knowledge of religious and cultural life in various traditions and parts of the world. Topics considered include fieldwork, ethics, participatory methods, and the challenges of interpreting and representing religious experience. While the class is open to advanced undergraduates, it is primarily intended as a graduate course.

SPHG 720: Leading for Racial Equity: Examining Structural Issues of Race and Class, Geni Eng (Department of Health Behavior), Tye Hunter (School of Law), Bay Love (Strategy Consultant), and Deborah Stroman (School of Business)

  • This interdisciplinary seminar partners with the Racial Equity Institute (REI), a national anti-racism training organization, to prepare UNC-Chapel Hill graduate students to become effective leaders in an increasingly diverse world. The goal is to provide them with a framework that directs them to critically analyze institutions, rather than characteristics of individuals and groups, in order to understand institutional legacy, response, and accountability to different populations. This course also involves local community members as a key element of the pedagogy, so that the interactive nature of the course will allow all participants to learn from the perspectives of others with different backgrounds and in different stages of life. Participants will complete intensive 2-day training with REI trainers and course instructors on the explicit and subtle ways that racialized patterns in American culture, policies, and practices permeate political, economic, and social structures. Following this initial training, participants will meet 9am-4pm on two days to discuss, evaluate, and analyze completed readings and group-work assignments to be submitted for assessment and credit.

Elective Courses for Spring 2017:

RELI 724: Ethnographic Research Methods: Ethnography of Religion and Religious Formations

  • This course engages the practices, politics, ethics, and epistemology of ethnography as a technique of data production, analysis, and representation. While we will privilege issues and themes related to the study of religion, the course offers a broad, multidisciplinary approach to the construction and execution of ethnographic research.

HBEH 710: Community Capacity, Competence, and Power, Dr. Geni Eng and Dr. Alex Lightfoot, Department of Health Behavior

  • The nature and delineation of participatory action research and its relevance to concepts, principles, and practices of community empowerment.  Students learn methods, such as photovoice, through learning projects. This seminar will have three core areas of focus and integration. First, participants will be engaged in interactive learning about community-based participatory action research (CBPR), an approach to inquiry that centers on community strengths and issues, and provides people with the means to conduct systematic investigation for the purposes of education and taking systematic action to resolve specific problems. Second, we will use the principles and theoretical grounding of CBPR to discuss concepts central to this process, including community competence, citizen participation and community development. Third, participants will conduct a fieldwork project using photography with a community that will generate critical thinking about the methodological contexts of public health research and their shifting “locations of power” during the various stages of the CBPR process.

Folk 860 (ANTH 860): Art of Ethnography, Dr. Glenn Hinson, Dept. of Anthropology

  • A field-based exploration of the pragmatic, ethical, and theoretical dimensions of ethnographic research, addressing issues of experience, aesthetics, authority, and worldview through the lens of cultural encounter. Field research required.

ANTH 898-062: Writing Lives, Dr. Charles Price, Dept. of Anthropology

  • The goal of Writing Lives is to facilitate the development of students’ qualitative and analytic research skills through a project that culminates in writing a polished life narrative. Students will design a research plan; share research strategies; discuss ethical concerns; develop a research relationship with an interlocutor; hone methodological techniques such as in-depth interviewing and writing field notes; transcribe, organize, and analyze an in-depth interview; and generate a life narrative informed by grounded explanations and the relevant literature. The focus of the course project will be identity, with an emphasis on “becoming and being” – that is, how do people develop and cultivate particular identifications?

Global 382: Latin American Migrant Perspectives: Ethnography and Action, Dr. Hannah Gill, Dept. of Global Studies

  • This 3 credit Spring course is interdisciplinary, combining qualitative methods, migration theory, and service-learning in a course that examines Latin American immigrant perspectives. Students will research and work with immigrants in receiving communities in North Carolina and spend spring break in immigrants’ home communities in Guanajuato, Mexico.

Elective Courses for Fall 2016:

ANTH 674: Issues in Cultural Heritage, Dr. Patricia A. McAnany, Dept. of Anthropology

Wednesday, 9:05-11:35 AM, Alumni Room 308

  • Issues in Cultural Heritage examines the entanglements between the past and the present from multiple and conflicting perspectives. Models of participatory research in which knowledge production is de-centered and includes groups involved in the heritage under study are a key part of this course. We examine heritage from several different perspectives: archaeological, global (i.e., UNESCO), indigenous, nationalist, and localized. From an indigenous perspective, heritage rights have come to be synonymous with human rights; we examine this premise in reference to the conflictive arena that pits local desires against those of nation-states and global entities. Different approaches to heritage conservation are considered, especially in relation to tangible and intangible heritage. Two guest speakers highlight heritage issues in relation to the earliest Americans (Dr. Joe Watkins of the National Park Service) and the violently endangered tangible heritage of Syria (Dr. Michael Danti).

Folk 790: Public Folklore

Date, Time, and Location TBD

  • This graduate seminar addresses the world of public folklore, exploring theory and praxis in public sector cultural work.  Focusing on the ways that cultural workers (folklorists and others) bring their understandings to broader publics, and the ways that we can convey these understandings in full collaboration with the communities being represented, this course explores broad issues of representation, cultural politics, touristic display, and culturally-based economic development.  While doing so, it remains eminently pragmatic, drawing participants into conversation with public folklorists, inviting them to attend (and assess) public folklore events, and chartering the ways that public cultural outreach translates in the 21st century.  At the seminar’s close, each participant will have written a fundable proposal for a public folklore project.

PLAN 764: Techniques in Community Development, Dr. Mai Thi Nguyen, City and Regional Planning

Tuesday, 2:00-4:45 PM, Hamilton Hall 570

  • The steps involved in developing neighborhood revitalization plans. Students work with local neighborhood associations in identifying both community assets and problems and the various stakeholders, conducting research on selected issues, developing and selecting strategies for addressing those issues, and formulating an implementation strategy.

MUSC 970.001 Seminar in Ethnomusicology, Dr. Cherie Rivers Ndaliko, Music Department

Tuesday, 2:00-4:50 PM, location TBD

  • This seminar examines emerging trends toward social justice and social engagement within the field of ethnomusicology. Drawing on diverse case studies from the African continent, we will explore the complex intersections of music with global politics in regions of conflict and emergency. Sites of conflict and emergency are typically characterized by the presence of military forces and/or humanitarian NGOs, as well as by overt and veiled negotiations of power between diverse social groups (ethnic, economic, religious, gendered, etc.), both of which factors directly shape culture production. Using analytical frameworks from ethnomusicology and (visual) anthropology, we will study songs, music videos, and short films produced in conflict regions with critical attention to (1) the social and cultural politics of their production; (2) their “inherent” and “relative” aesthetic qualities; and (3) the spectrum of cultural values associated with such works. In addition to the analytical components on this seminar, students will also study methods including ethnography, community-based participatory research, and other methodologies of socially engaged scholarship.
  • Students will be expected to complete two methodological exercises (e.g. interviews, research journals, etc.); one short paper (3-5 pages); and one seminar paper (15-18 pages). Further, students will have the opportunity to develop additional professional skills through participating in the academic conference on this topic that will be held at UNC in October 2016.

ANTH 898-062: Writing Lives, Dr. Charles Price, Dept. of Anthropology

Date, Time, and Location TBD

  • The goal of Writing Lives is to facilitate the development of students’ qualitative and analytic research skills through a project that culminates in writing a polished life narrative. Students will design a research plan; share research strategies; discuss ethical concerns; develop a research relationship with an interlocutor; hone methodological techniques such as in-depth interviewing and writing field notes; transcribe, organize, and analyze an in-depth interview; and generate a life narrative informed by grounded explanations and the relevant literature. The focus of the course project will be identity, with an emphasis on “becoming and being” – that is, how do people develop and cultivate particular identifications?

Elective Courses for Spring 2016:

SOWO 799: Community-Led Sustainable Development, Dr. Marie Weil, School of Social Work

  • This new graduate course is being designed and will be implemented in partnership with the Resourceful Communities Program (RCP) of The Conservation Fund located in Chapel Hill. RCP works with more than 200 Grassroots Organizations who are their Community Partners, across North Carolina, to assist in capacity building so that community groups can achieve their own project goals building on RCP’s triple bottom line framework for Sustainable Development: Economic Development, Social Justice, and Environmental Stewardship. Marie Weil of the School of Social Work will be the lead faculty member collaborating with RCP Representative Community Partners, other faculty, and RCP Staff: Mikki Sager, Director, Kathleen Marks, Associate Director, and Sarah Guidi, Community Trainer.
  • This course is designed to engage students in active and reflective learning to prepare them to engage with grassroots community members in capacity building for locally determined sustainable development projects, programs and participatory research. Lectures, discussions, and presentations from Resourceful Communities Grassroots Partners, RCP staff and other experts will enrich learning and prompt reflection about the complexities of collaboration, participatory research, and projects with grassroots groups. The course seeks to prepare students with knowledge and skills to work respectfully and effectively to build the movement for grassroots sustainable development.
  • See the attached flyer for more details: CLSD_Flyer

HBEH 710: Community Capacity, Competence, and Power, Dr. Geni Eng and Dr. Alex Lightfoot, Department of Health Behavior

  • The nature and delineation of participatory action research and its relevance to concepts, principles, and practices of community empowerment.  Students learn methods, such as photovoice, through learning projects. This seminar will have three core areas of focus and integration. First, participants will be engaged in interactive learning about community-based participatory action research (CBPR), an approach to inquiry that centers on community strengths and issues, and provides people with the means to conduct systematic investigation for the purposes of education and taking systematic action to resolve specific problems. Second, we will use the principles and theoretical grounding of CBPR to discuss concepts central to this process, including community competence, citizen participation and community development. Third, participants will conduct a fieldwork project using photography with a community that will generate critical thinking about the methodological contexts of public health research and their shifting “locations of power” during the various stages of the CBPR process.

Folk 860 (ANTH 860): Art of Ethnography, Dr. Glenn Hinson, Dept. of Anthropology

  • A field-based exploration of the pragmatic, ethical, and theoretical dimensions of ethnographic research, addressing issues of experience, aesthetics, authority, and worldview through the lens of cultural encounter. Field research required.

Comm 668: The Ethnographic Return, Dr. Della Pollock, Dept. of Communication Studies

  •  This course explores the intersection of ethnographic theory/practice and discourses of sustainable community change with the aim of making appropriate and effective contributions to community development.

ANTH 898-062: Writing Lives, Dr. Charles Price, Dept. of Anthropology

  • Description to be added.

Elective Courses for Fall 2015:

ANTH 449: Anthropology and Marxism, Dr. Don Nonini, Dept. of Anthropology

  • This course provides an introduction to the anthropological subdiscipline called Marxian anthropology or Marxist anthropology.  This subdiscipline can be defined as the critical anthropology of capitalism, class societies, and modern life from the perspective of a materialist conception of history (a.k.a. interpretive political economy).  During the course, we will come to understand the basic assumptions and knowledge that arise from this perspective. In one form or another, this subdiscipline has existed and developed as a distinctive approach within historical anthropology for the last century, although we will concentrate on writings in Marxian anthropology over the last two decades.
  • There are two objectives to this course.  The first is to develop further while questioning fundamental concepts of the materialist conception of history as set forth by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels from the 19th century, as interpreted and made relevant to contemporary issues in the study of capitalism. In order to achieve this first objective, the first one third of the course will be devoted to the study of the writings of Karl Marx, especially his magnum opus, Capital: Volume 1. During the first one third of the course, we will study his writings, his theoretical and analytical approach, and his conclusions about the capitalism of his time in an open, questioning and critical way – assessing what remains useful from his work, and what needs to be rethought.
  • The second objective of the course is to examine specific issues in the study of contemporary capitalism, and its connections to labor, race/racialization, the environment, imperialism, the subordination of women, and other related topics. In order to achieve this objective, during the last two thirds of the course we will examine five modules/parts of the course consisting of readings and discussions organized around issues about capitalism and its effects on society, the environment, and on the people who experience it. Each module of 2-4 readings and sessions will culminate in a “research and action” session in which several students will take responsibility in class to lead class discussion by presenting questions about the texts they have previously read in the module as these texts bear on the specific contemporary issue examined in this session. In the case of some students, they will be able to move beyond asking research-oriented questions about the contemporary issue (e.g., criminalization of poor people) to engage in relevant collaborative research with specific UNC student or civil-society social change organizations.  This is a requirement for any graduate student in the Graduate Certificate in Participatory Research who is taking this course an elective, as well as an option for undergraduate students who have received my permission.

ANTH 674: Issues in Cultural Heritage, Dr. Patricia A. McAnany, Dept. of Anthropology

  • Issues in Cultural Heritage examines the entanglements between the past and the present from multiple and conflicting perspectives. Models of participatory research in which knowledge production is de-centered and includes groups involved in the heritage under study are a key part of this course. We examine heritage from several different perspectives: archaeological, global (i.e., UNESCO), indigenous, nationalist, and localized. From an indigenous perspective, heritage rights have come to be synonymous with human rights; we examine this premise in reference to the conflictive arena that pits local desires against those of nation-states and global entities. Different approaches to heritage conservation are considered, especially in relation to tangible and intangible heritage. Two guest speakers highlight heritage issues in relation to the earliest Americans (Dr. Joe Watkins of the National Park Service) and the violently endangered tangible heritage of Syria (Dr. Michael Danti).

GEOG 543: Qualitative Methods in Geography, Dr. Sara Smith, Dept. of Geography

  • This course comprises a critical introduction to qualitative methods in geography for graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Methods covered will include interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and some visual methodologies such as photovoice. Participatory approaches to research will be woven through the course. We will also discuss modes of analysis, coding, and writing up qualitative research for publication.
  • Structure of the course: In the first two weeks of the course, we will discuss principles of qualitative research, including an overview of the various epistemological projects informing qualitative research in geography. We will then turn our attention to the practicalities of methods commonly used in qualitative geographic research, drawing on associated disciplines. Adjustments to the methods covered may be made according to the composition of the class on a semester by semester basis. As we survey the methods, we will read practical “how-to” literature, but we will also collectively seek out examples of well-done research using these tools, and trace the ways that scholar has used these methods, including a discussion of how they built their argument around specific modes of analysis. In the last part of the semester, we will take what we have learned and begin applying it to individual research projects. Each student will create a comprehensive research design plan – not a proposal, but rather an overview of a particular set of methods to address a question, with additional details in place such as a sampling strategy, sample interview questions, participant observation guidelines, coding rubrics, and other materials needed to pursue this research. We will collectively read, provide feedback, and work to improve these research designs in the last month of the class. The final component of class is a research paper on a particular method or set of methods to be devised in discussion with me.

Folk 790: Public Folklore, Dr. Glenn Hinson, Dept. of Anthropology

  • This graduate seminar addresses the world of public folklore, exploring theory and praxis in public sector cultural work.  Focusing on the ways that cultural workers (folklorists and others) bring their understandings to broader publics, and the ways that we can convey these understandings in full collaboration with the communities being represented, this course explores broad issues of representation, cultural politics, touristic display, and culturally-based economic development.  While doing so, it remains eminently pragmatic, drawing participants into conversation with public folklorists, inviting them to attend (and assess) public folklore events, and chartering the ways that public cultural outreach translates in the 21st century.  At the seminar’s close, each participant will have written a fundable proposal for a public folklore project.

MUSC 970.002 Culture and Activism in Congo: Ethics and Methods, Dr. Cherie Rivers Ndaliko, Music Department

  • This course interrogates new modes of scholarship using the Congo as a case study. With its distinct combination of cultural wealth, political collapse, and humanitarian crisis, the Democratic Republic of the Congo provides a striking context in which to explore both the ethics and practices of cultural activism. Culture and Activism in Congo: Ethics and Methods is an interdisciplinary project-based seminar in which students will investigate theories and practices of social engagement through research and participation in arts initiatives that intervene in Congo’s socio-political landscape. The course is structured around (1) key figures—primarily musicians and artist-activists—whose artistic work has impacted Congo’s past and present, and (2) projects—historic and ongoing—that integrate creativity with claims of social justice. To complement the project component of the course, students will also interrogate the ways in which theoretical models advanced by post-colonial studies intersect with the emerging methodologies and practices associated with “socially engaged scholarship.” Students will be expected to engage actively in a number of ways including leading class discussions; participating in project-related research activities such as ethnographic and archival investigation, transcription, and translation; as well as to complete a micro research project. Grading will be based on the successful completion of research projects, two short papers (4-6 pages each), and in-class presentations.

Elective Courses for Spring 2015:

Folk 860 (ANTH 860): Art of Ethnography, Dr. Glenn Hinson, Dept. of Anthropology

  • A field-based exploration of the pragmatic, ethical, and theoretical dimensions of ethnographic research, addressing issues of experience, aesthetics, authority, and worldview through the lens of cultural encounter. Field research required.

Global 382: Latin American Migrant Perspectives: Ethnography and Action, Dr. Hannah Gill, Dept. of Global Studies

  • This 3 credit Spring course is interdisciplinary, combining qualitative methods, migration theory, and service-learning in a course that examines Latin American immigrant perspectives. Students will research and work with immigrants in receiving communities in North Carolina and spend spring break in immigrants’ home communities in Guanajuato, Mexico.

HBEH 710: Community Capacity, Competence, and Power, Dr. Geni Eng and Dr. Alex Lightfoot, Department of Health Behavior

  • The nature and delineation of participatory action research and its relevance to concepts, principles, and practices of community empowerment.  Students learn methods, such as photovoice, through learning projects.

Comm 668: The Ethnographic Return, Dr. Della Pollock, Dept. of Communication Studies

  •  This course explores the intersection of ethnographic theory/practice and discourses of sustainable community change with the aim of making appropriate and effective contributions to community development.

ANTH 898-062: Writing Lives, Dr. Charles Price, Dept. of Anthropology

  • Description to be added.

Elective Courses for Fall 2014:

Folk 790: Public Folklore, Dr. Glenn Hinson, Dept. of Anthropology

  • This graduate seminar addresses the world of public folklore, exploring theory and praxis in public sector cultural work.  Focusing on the ways that cultural workers (folklorists and others) bring their understandings to broader publics, and the ways that we can convey these understandings in full collaboration with the communities being represented, this course explores broad issues of representation, cultural politics, touristic display, and culturally-based economic development.  While doing so, it remains eminently pragmatic, drawing participants into conversation with public folklorists, inviting them to attend (and assess) public folklore events, and chartering the ways that public cultural outreach translates in the 21st century.  At the seminar’s close, each participant will have written a fundable proposal for a public folklore project.

PLAN 764: Techniques in Community Development, Dr. Mai Thi Nguyen, City and Regional Planning

  • The steps involved in developing neighborhood revitalization plans. Students work with local neighborhood associations in identifying both community assets and problems and the various stakeholders, conducting research on selected issues, developing and selecting strategies for addressing those issues, and formulating an implementation strategy.

RELI 688: Observation and Interpretation of Religious Action (Ethnographic Methods for the Study of Religion), Dr. Lauren Leve, Religious Studies

  • This course engages the practices, politics, ethics, and epistemology of ethnography as a technique of data production and analysis, with particular attention to religious phenomena. It is primarily intended as a hands-on workshop for graduate students who are currently, or will soon be, engaged in ethnographic research. The class is organized around the assumption that the best ethnographic research is founded on a critical and diverse acquaintance with other ethnographers’ work (both fieldwork practices and published texts) and on a rigorous analysis of the epistemological assumptions that underlie the production of ethnographic knowledge. While this course will privilege problems that arise in the study of religion, it should be useful to a wide range of students interested in the dilemmas, practices and politics of ethnographic research and analysis.Specific topics to be addressed include participant-observation; interviewing; modes of description, inscription and interpretation; the nature of “the field” and the practice of fieldwork in era of new communication technologies and globalization; the tension between positioned knowledge and positivist objectivity; participatory methodologies; problems of power, subjectivity, rhetoric and representation; “experience”; and multi-sited research strategies, as well as ethnographic epistemology and ethics.