Certificate Sponsored Workshops

Upcoming Workshops

Workshops that meet the requirement for the Certificate are marked by an *.

Check back soon for upcoming workshops.

Previous Workshops

Participatory Research: Critical Dialogues/Stories from the Field

Please join us as Professor Leslie Robertson and Professor Terre Satterfield draw from their collaborative / participatory research projects with First Nations people ofFlier for Satterfield Robertson Visit_FINAL Western Canada to discuss new methods (Monday) and to stimulate a discussion of the significance of
participatory research (Tuesday). There will be two events co-sponsored by the Graduate Certificate in Participatory Research, Carolina Center for Public Service, and the Department of Anthropology.

Monday February 1st (12:30 — 2:00 PM, Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library): Collaborative / Participatory Research: Past Lessons, Current Projects

Tuesday February 2nd (3:30 — 5:15 PM, Alumni Building Room 207): The Turn to Participatory / Collaborative Research: Significance for the Disciplines

For details on the biographies of Professor Robertson and Professor Satterfield, please see the accompanying document. For more details on the event, please see the attached flyer. Dorothy Holland (dholland@unc.edu) may be contacted with any questions.

Seed Grants and Summer Research Fellowships*

December 9th,  12:30-1:00 pm, 313a Alumni Hall

Please join us for this exciting event on student funding! The purpose of our workshop is to help students submit proposals to fund their own research. We will cover two types of funding mechanisms: summer research fellowships (http://gradschool.unc.edu/funding/gradschool/summerresearch.html) and participatory research seed grants (http://participatoryresearch.web.unc.edu/funding/).

You will have an opportunity to hear about the funding mechanisms, share ideas about how to include participatory research elements, and discuss any questions, issues, or concerns. This will be a great opportunity for any graduate students interested in participatory research AND summer funding.

If you have any questions, please email Dottie Holland at at: dolland@unc.edu or Sarah Kowitt at: kowitt@email.unc.edu

Participatory Research (PR) Workshop Forum*

Organized by the Graduate Certificate in Participatory Research Program (refreshments provided).

The purpose of these workshops is to help individual researchers working with participatory methodologies think through particular problems, issues, or questions that arise during any stage in the course of their research including proposal preparation and the search for partners. These workshops will be safe and open spaces for creative and critical dialogue.  They are not testing grounds or platforms for polished academic performances.  These workshops are to help each other become better researchers in ways that grow and cultivate participatory research.

Here is how the workshops will run:

  • A PR researcher wishing to present their research –whether it be dissertation, community initiated, senior scholar, etc. research–will send us a brief 3 – 5 page document elaborating on a particular issue in their research. (Note: that non-text based project outcomes are welcome.)  (The presenter is also invited to bring community collaborators to the session.)  Send the material and inquiries to Kenny Richards (kennethr@live.unc.edu) with a cc to dholland@unc.edu.
  • We will circulate this document ahead of time to everyone on the Friends of Participatory Research Listserv along with an invitation to attend the workshop. (Send a message to Sarah Kowitt (kowitt@email.unc.edu) if you want to be added to the listserv.)
  • Two respondents will be selected to formally respond to the issue.  (You may make suggestions as to who might be a good respondent.  We strongly encourage you to invite community experts/members as respondents.)
  • The workshops will be organized so that the presenter will have about 5 minutes to introduce themselves and their work to the group.  The respondents will then have 10 minutes or so to present their material.  For the remainder of the workshop (which will ideally be the majority of time) the discussion will be opened to everyone.

If you are interested in presenting please email Kenny Richards at kennethr@live.unc.edu. Previous participants have included:

Stan Thayne who workshopped: Going back to the field (and asking them to read what you write)

How do you present your working chapters to community members? That is, how do you frame your follow-up request for their input? What sort of feedback exactly are you looking for from them? How do you prepare in advance for the possibility that they may object to your representation of their views? What if they feel you have represented their views properly but object to your framing of the broader issue (for example, your stance toward the wider religious-scriptural tradition)? And how do you prepare for and execute all of this within a realistic timeframe, with a potential graduation deadline looming (particularly in the case that you get a job offer and need to get this thing written)?

My dissertation examines how American Indian converts to Mormonism (or life-long members) interpret the Book of Mormon, a text which purports to be a history of the ancient Americas and depicts Indigenous peoples as migrant Israelites whose ancestors were cursed with a skin of blackness for rejecting the covenant. It also prophecies of their conversion and “blossoming” in the last days. My project is an ethnography of reading, based on fieldwork among American Indian Mormons.

Leslie Adams who workshopped: Tips and Strategies for Conducting Participatory Research in Political Contexts: 

How do you integrate political and community interests for a common goal? When political bodies begin initiatives to improve the community, how do you celebrate these efforts while also communicating that some populations were left behind in the process? What strategies will engage communities that are skeptical of the political process to participate in these initiatives? How do I move my participatory research forward in a way that serves both political, community, and academic interests? Finally, how do you navigate all these issues from the position of a first year doctoral student?

My summer project will be with a national campaign aimed at improving the life outcomes of young men of color. This political initiative, which is supported locally by the Durham County Government, will facilitate efforts to address the educational, physical, social and emotional needs of young people (ages 11-21) that span multiple life stages from cradle-to-college. This project will use participatory methods to engage young men in the improvement of health outcomes for this population. Key activities will include participatory asset mapping and focus groups among young males of color, all held in coordination with local citizens and members of the political initiative. The overall goal of this project is to foster dialogue and cohesiveness on health promotion issues that are most vital to young men in Durham.

If you have any questions, please email Kenny at: kennethr@live.unc.edu. Stay tuned for upcoming workshops!

Participatory Research Panel*: Transforming the University? Lessons from Participatory / Collaborative Research: A panel with Arturo Escobar (Anthropology), Geni Eng (Health Behavior), and Della Pollock (Communications Studies) 

Friday April 10th, 3-5 PM, Global Education Center, FedEx Building

Organized by the Graduate Certificate in Participatory Research Program (refreshments provided)

Seed Grants and Summer Research Fellowships*

February 2nd,  5:30-7:00 pm, GEC fourth floor

Please join us for this exciting event on student funding! The purpose of our workshop is to help students submit proposals to fund their own research. We will cover two types of funding mechanisms: summer research fellowships (http://gradschool.unc.edu/funding/gradschool/summerresearch.html) and participatory research seed grants (http://participatoryresearch.web.unc.edu/funding/).

You will have an opportunity to hear about the funding mechanisms, share ideas about how to include participatory research elements, and discuss any questions, issues, or concerns. This will be a great opportunity for any graduate students interested in participatory research AND summer funding.

If you have any questions, please email Dottie Holland at at: dolland@unc.edu or Sarah Kowitt at: kowitt@email.unc.edu